Tuesday, 24 April 2018

PHOTOS, POSTCARDS, SNIPPETS, OCCASIONAL NOTICES ETC ETC (Archived after one week....ish)


Currently being offered for sale on EBAY (18th May 2018)

Helmshore CP School c1963 (Click over to enlarge)

Photo: Kindly shared by Dorothy Flynn and uploaded here on 14th March 2017
also filed under Helmshore CP School photo blog

Here below is information kindly shared with us by Stephen Haines (Pupil in the photo) 
This is a photograph of our class when we were about eight years old.  The teacher was Mrs Pilling, who was certainly a teacher of the old school.  I remember her as a formidable lady, quite strict, who would punish misdemeanours with a ruler across the hand, and across the back of the legs for greater crimes.  I felt it on more than one occasion.  Yet, she knew how to encourage her young charges.  She had a system of stars, used in other classes too, of various colours, the highest valued being silver and gold and there was a healthy competition to try to achieve them.  I looked forwards to going up to her class because we would begin subjects like history and geography.  At the time I’d no idea what they were, but their mysterious, grown-up names sounded far more exciting than the reading, writing and sums we did lower down the school.  She was a brilliant teacher and I learned a lot from her lessons.  We had a reading book that had vivid coloured drawings on one side and text on the other, and I was so impressed that I got my mum to buy me a copy so that I could read it at home.  One of the things she got us to read was extracts from the “Song of Hiawatha” by HW Longfellow.  Hiawatha became one of my childhood heroes and because of it I changed sides when watching Westerns.  I began supporting the Indians and not the Cowboys.   I can’t imagine any teacher nowadays trying to get eight-year-old pupils to read such challenging stuff.  She did and, fifty-odd years later, I can still recite chunks of it from memory.  That’s a good teacher.
To the class:  back row, going from left to right we have Stefan Koman, Noel Pilling, me, Richard West, Philip Abbot and Norman Constantine.  On the second row is Peter Edmundson, Alan Carr, Paul Mellor, Tony Barnes, Billy Hanson, Robert Oldfield, Martin Nuttall and James Walker.  He doesn’t appear in the other photographs that I’ve written about, but his family lived on Broadway, on the left-hand side as you go up the hill from the junction with Lancaster Avenue.  He became known as “Judd” and played in goal for the Helmshore Youth football team I played in.  Last on the row is Kevin Kerr.
The girl on the left of the front row is Stephanie Knight and next to her is Susan Burke.  She didn’t stay long in the class with us, her family moving away, but at the time they lived on Raven Avenue.  Next to Susan is Wendy Howarth and then comes Brenda Holden.  Her family lived, I think, in the Holcolme Road area of the village.  Next is Dorothy Ratcliffe and I can’t remember the name of the girl to her right, but she might have been called Carole Busky.  Then comes Carole Beardsworth, Jeanette, whose surname I can’t recall, and Sheila Skupsky.  She was another whose family moved out of the area and didn’t stay long in the class.  Finally sits Anne Priddle.  Anne was one of a large family who lived in a big house on the corner of Mayfield Avenue and Helmshore Road, in Flaxmoss.
Of the front five girls, Jackie Tremble is on the left.  Then comes Carole Dowd, Stephanie Watson, Carole Bond and Susan Haygarth.  (Again, I hope I’ve spelled the Caroles correctly.)



 Photo: Kindly shared to us by Tim Kirby


 Photo: Kindly shared to us by Tim Kirby


 Photo: Kindly shared to us by Tim Kirby


 Photo: Kindly shared to us by Tim Kirby


 Photo: Kindly shared to us by Tim Kirby


 Photo: Kindly shared to us by Tim Kirby


Photo: Kindly shared to us by Tim Kirby

Helmshore CP School c1961 (Click over to enlarge)

Photo: Kindly shared by Dorothy Flynn and uploaded here on 14th March 2017
also filed under Helmshore CP School photo blog

Information kindly shared to us by Stephen Haines about his classmates in the photo:

Starting with the front row, the boy on the left is Peter Edmundson.  Peter had two older brothers, John and Ian, and a younger sister called Janet and they lived on Broadway, in the second house of the first semi as you turn left out of Brooklands Avenue.  His father was called Ernest and he was a butcher in Accrington, whilst his mother was Vera and she worked in the research department at TMM, Wavell Mill, on Holcombe Road.  They had a Rover 90 car, the biggest vehicle in that part of the village, at a time when most families didn’t have cars.
The girl sat next to Peter is Susan Haygarth.  She had an older brother called Brian and they also lived on Broadway in a house before Devon Crescent is reached, opposite what is now the High School.  Then it was fields.  Next to Susan is Martin Nuttall whose family lived on Helmshore Road.  Theirs was the first house of the last semi before you reach the drive into St Veronica’s church.
The girl in glasses on the left of the second row is Jacqueline Tremble, who lived somewhere in the Lancaster / York Avenue area, and she is sitting next to Robert Oldfield, often known as Ockey.  He had an older sister and they lived on Gregory Fold, in the last house in the row of stone cottages opposite the primary school.  His family often spoke of having seen or heard apparitions and it was widely accepted that the house was haunted.
The boy poking his head from behind that of Susan is me, Stephen Haines.  At that time, I had a younger brother called David – Stuart, the youngest, came along several years later – and we lived in the terrace on Brooklands Avenue, at no. 12.  My father was Arthur, who worked as a conductor for the bus department of Haslingden Corporation.  He had arrived in Haslingden in 1939 as a war-time evacuee from Salford and his family followed him here a little later.  My mother, Marion, was a weaver at Barlow’s Mill, off Holcombe Road, and her family had arrived here from Blackburn in the mid-1930s.
The boy next to me was Philip Cheetham and I remember little about him as he was not in the school long as his family out of the area.  I cannot work out who the others in the photograph are, though the girl at the very back, also in glasses, is I think Dorothy Ratcliffe.  If so, she is, again I think, the person who posted this photo on the website.  I think she lived on one of the streets right off Lancaster Avenue, as you go up.
The school milk was always delivered to the Gregory Fold side of the school and it was the job of the older boys, which we were not, to bring it inside.  I always preferred the milk in winter, when it was cold.  On really cold days, such as during the harsh winter of 1963, the milk froze and we thought it was like having ice cream.  I summer it was not so nice, as it was often warm and sometimes began to curdle.
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Helmshore CP School c1964/65 (Click over to enlarge)

Photo: Kindly shared by Dorothy Flynn and uploaded here on 14th March 2017
also filed under Helmshore CP School photo blog


The following information is kindly shared to us by Stephen Haines one of the pupils in the above photo: 
This is the same class as in the picture above, but several years later.  The teacher was Mr Hartley and I don’t remember much about him other that he left the primary school at the end of the school year and took a post at Haslingden Secondary Modern School, where some of those in this picture would have re-encountered him when they transferred there in 1966.
The boy at the left of the back row is Stefan Koman.  He had siblings and his family lived on Broadway, in a house halfway up the hill, as the road rises after its junction with Lancaster Avenue.  His father had arrived from Poland after the war and his mother was Jenny Walkden, who had been a school friend of my mother’s.  Not long after this photo was taken, they moved to Accrington.
Next to Stefan is Richard West, who had an elder sister and who lived on Holcombe Road, in a house on the left as you go towards the Italian restaurant, then the White Horse.  I don’t know the boy next to him, but the fourth boy is Noel Pilling.  His family lived on York Avenue, on the left near to its junction with Helmshore Road.
I am next to Noel and next to me is Martin Nuttall.  Next to Martin is Norman Constantine.  His family lived in one of the stone cottages by the river at the end of the drive that runs alongside Helmshore Memorial Gardens.  I don’t remember the name of the boy standing next to Norman.
The boy on the left of the middle row is Philip Abbott, who had a sister and who lived on Somerset Walk, on the right as you go up.  Then comes Peter Edmundson and then Alan Carr.  Alan also had a sister and his family ran Higher Cocker Farm, mainly dairy, but with a few pigs and poultry.  I remember the farm was a good place to hang around on Fridays, as that was baking day and his mother made fantastic cakes.  Rossendale Golf Club bought the farm soon after this picture was taken and they moved away.
The fourth boy on the row is Robert Oldfield and next to him is Billy Hanson, the biggest boy in the class.  His family lived near to the top of Granville Street.  Next to Billy is Paul Mellor, who later became Paul Chadwick.  He lived somewhere in Flaxmoss, around Mayfield Avenue, and next to him is Tony Barnes.  Tony lived on Helmshore Road, in a house opposite St Veronica’s, and I remember that whenever Corgi brought out a new model car, he was always the first to get it.  He was often to be seen racing his cars down the playground at the back of the school.
The boy second from the right Kevin Kerr, whose family lived on Devon Crescent and with whom I later played football for Helmshore Youth.  By then he’d acquired the nickname Hector, presumably after the Derby County player.  Last on the row is Johnny Smithson.  He had a sister called Anne and his family also lived on Holcombe Road, near to Richard West.  His father worked at Higher Mill.
The girl on the left of the front row is Susan Haygarth.  Then comes Jackie Tremble and next to her is Wendy Howarth.  Her family lived on Holcombe Road, somewhere opposite its junction with Bell Alley.  I can’t remember the name of the girl fourth on the row, though I think the fifth girl was called Jeanette, but I cannot recall her surname.
The next girl is Dorothy Ratcliffe and then comes Stephanie Knight.  Her father was called Ernie, who, like my father, worked for the Corporation.  They lived in the Flaxmoss area.  Next sits Carole Dowd, who lived in the Lancaster Avenue area and next to her is Stephanie Watson.  She had an elder brother called Graham and they lived on Brooklands Avenue, on the right near its junction with Raven Avenue.  The family later moved out of the area.
Second from right on that row is Carole Bond.  She lived somewhere around Holcombe Road, in the Higher Mill area, and her family moved to Blackburn sometime later.  The last girl on the row is Carole Beardsworth, though I can’t remember where she lived.  (I hope I’ve spelled the Caroles correctly.)
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Sad demise of part of Burgess Street (Click over to enlarge)
Photo: Kindly shared by Tim Kirby
The demolition area forms part of the Central Car Park behind the Library today buffering up to the Old Bank Street and the back of the old Woolworths buildings
Now included within the "Before The Central Flats Blog"
Far Back Pleasant Street from Bury Road (Click over to enlarge)
Photo: Kindly shared to us by Tim Kirby
Now included within the "Before The Central Flats Blog"




Ralph Holden's (Haslingden) Clothing Tokens
Kindly shared to us by Judith Brook
now archived under TOKENS









 S.S. Stotts - when the hole appeared in the main road
Thanks to Tim Kirby for sharing with us

  S.S. Stotts - when the hole appeared in the main road
Thanks to Tim Kirby for sharing with us








Now that it has been confirmed that Helmshore Textile Museum is to re-open next month we would like your help. Haslingden Roots and Haslingden Old and New have agreed to help the Museum to try and find people who worked there who could share stories and pictures about life in the Mill when it was in production. We have already supplied lots of details we hold and we are now looking for the more personal stories of the workers. If you can help please let us know and let's get this bit of our history documented before it's too late. This picture shows workers from Middle Mill a long time ago. Don't you just wish we could interview them today !!



or if you still want to check out

After one week the above photographs or text will be moved over to their appropriate blogs and will also be transferred over to  PHOTO ALBUM and SNIPPETS NO.6 (Year 2018) which can be accessed by clicking here


PHOTO ALBUM AND SNIPPETS NO.5 (Year 2017) which can be accessed by clicking here


PHOTO ALBUM AND SNIPPETS NO.4 (year 2016) which can be accessed by clicking here


 PHOTO ALBUM and SNIPPETS NO.3 (year 2015) which you can access by clicking here


or if you still want to check out

PHOTO ALBUM NO. 2 (YEAR 2014) WHICH 



PHOTO ALBUM No.1 (year 2013 and earlier) which you can access by clicking here (in preparation) 


Dont Forget!  HASLINGDEN ON FILM is accessed from the title further down on the left hand column - please enjoy the films.